Thursday, April 24, 2008

Heli Day 2

Day 2 the wind had stopped and the skies were without a cloud. After a smooth first day we quickly realized that today would not be as smooth.

The Absinthe film crew and riders are pissed that they have to share their helicopter with the masses like ourselves. They made this place what it is and don't like being told when they can and can not ride. There is a lot of talent in this photo! I also heard Absinthe had kicked down over 100 grand for chopper time, now that is a lot of coin and no wonder they have that sort of sway up there.


Shane Charlebois one of the Absinthe filmers and SLC local gives me and Aaron the lowdown on how things work up here. Filmers get priority, bottom line. That means we would have to wait until the morning light subsided for the filmers and we would get the high noon light to ride in. Once the evening light comes around we will be pulled to send out the film crews again. He had some good insight about riding these mountains too. "Its like the hottest chick you will ever meet, don't expect to get in her pants right away, you have to wine and dine her first."


After a few hours of waiting in the mud of Mile 33 we were told to high tail it down to 18 Mile. Me and Aaron affectionately named 18 Mile the "barnyard". Hey we were glad to get a chance at a few runs. I know some groups did not even get to fly this day and it was bluebird!


They stuck us with Tom Burt as our guide. Talk about a living legend! It was great to get his insight on these mountains and talk about our kids together! The guy is super down to earth. I ran into Tom at the restaurant a few days later. He told me how he wished he could have gotten us up on some sicker terrain but the avi conditions would just not allow it. I was like "no worries" we still got to shred some great pow together!








It might not have been the sickest runs of the trip, but the pow was delightful. Also it was kinda nice to bring it down a notch after the first day of constant avalanches. I guess TGR did not even film this day. They spent all day looking for good snow and scoping out safe lines for the next day. Also when we got back that night I heard some groups found nothing but wind scoured snow. This made us feel really good on how the day transpired.





Can the glacier ice get any more blue?


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